college of arts & sciences

Coffee Chat with Mayor Jim Gray

 

When you live in A&S Wired, you are connected to community.

And that certainly was the case when Lexington Mayor Jim Gray recently stopped by one of the monthly coffee chats to discuss the city that the students now call home, and their interaction within that community.

The mayor discussed the important relationship between UK and Lexington, especially with campus’ close proximity to downtown. He talked about the future of the Rupp Arena district, as well as how Lexington has been recognized as a top city for raising families.

The students were fully engaged as they inquired about the progress of the CentrePointe block in the middle of downtown, as well as other major plans the mayor wants to concentrate on for the future of Lexington.

Located in Keeneland Hall on UK’s north campus, A&S Wired allows first-year students to realize connectivity on all levels – from virtual to face-to-face, and from local to global. For more info visit wired.as.uky.edu

>>Photo album of the event

From Voids to Clusters: Gas and Galaxy Evolution in the Local Universe

Our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies and their large scale structure has advanced enormously over the last decade, thanks to an impressive synergy between theoretical and observational efforts. While the growth of the dark matter component seems well understood, the physics of the gas, during its accretion, removal and/or depletion is less well understood. Increasingly large scale optical surveys are tracing out the cosmic web of filaments and voids. Mathematical tools have been developed to describe these structures and to identify galaxies located in specific environments. HI imaging surveys begin to answer the question: how do galaxies get and lose their gas? The best evidence for ongoing gas accretion is found in the lowest density environments, while removal of gas in the highest density environments stops star formation and reddens the galaxies. Speaker: Jacquiline van Gorkom, Columbia University

Mountains of Empowerment

What's New in Science - Susan Barron Part 2

Drugs and the Brain Part 2: How and Why Drugs are Addictive for the Brain

Listening to the news, reading the newspapers, or talking to friends, we hear about drugs almost daily. This discussion will include some of the recent data about how the drugs that change the way we feel affect the brain. We will talk about why some drugs are so addictive relative to other drugs, why adolescence is such a vulnerable time for drug use and some novel approaches and medications that may have real potential for treating drug addiction and other brain disorders

What's New in Science - Susan Barron Part 3

Drugs and the Brain Part 3: How about Understanding Drug Withdrawal (from a Brain Perspective) and Pharmacotherapy

Listening to the news, reading the newspapers, or talking to friends, we hear about drugs almost daily. This discussion will include some of the recent data about how the drugs that change the way we feel affect the brain. We will talk about why some drugs are so addictive relative to other drugs, why adolescence is such a vulnerable time for drug use and some novel approaches and medications that may have real potential for treating drug addiction and other brain disorders

Jiang'an Temple

May 2012, members of HIVE and various UK instructors traveled to Shanghai, China to participate in an Appalachian Symposium with members of Shanghai University.

One ancient Chinese structure that was visited by these travelers in China was the Jing'an Temple. Jing'an Temple was built in 247 A.D., and was famous for its "Eight Sights." "Bubbling Well," one of the Eight Sights, was known as "The Six Springs on Earth." A copper bell made in Ming Dynasty is still in the temple today. The Jing'an Temple has a collection of bronze, calligraphy, paintings, and Buddha sculptures from various dynasties up to Western Zhou era.

Filmed & Edited by: Dana Rogers

Yongjia Markets

While China is famous for its booming metropolises of Shanghai and Beijing, many people still live in rural communities. A&S Hive members Dana Rogers and Cheyenne Hohman traveled to Yiwen Chen's hometown in Yongja, China.

Yongja natives have a distinct culture and dialect. In the past, their rural society was isolated from the rest of their country because of the mountainous area on one side of the town and the river surrounding the other side. However, in the past few years, China has created a High Speed Railway system making it easier to travel to these rural landscapes. This video shows a grandmother's daily trip to the markets of Yongja.

Filmed & Edited by: Dana Rogers

If you would like to view some images of the markets and indigenous foods to the landscapes of Yongja please visit:

flickr.com/photos/ukartsci/sets/72157630716436340/

flickr.com/photos/ukartsci/sets/72157629802393068/

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