By Whitney Hale

(Sept. 14, 2015) — Constitution Day, also known as Citizenship Day, commemorates the ratification of the United States Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787. Each year on Sept. 17th, federally funded educational institutions are required to hold educational programming in honor of this historic event. 

The University of Kentucky is honored to celebrate Constitution Day 2015 with a full day of exciting and informative events. Under the direction of the Office of the President and the Office of the Provost, the UK Division of Undergraduate Education (UGE) has led the charge in organizing UK Constitution Day 2015 "Learning


By Whitney Harder

(Sept. 3, 2015) — Who said reading only had one season? Sure, fall is approaching and life is getting busy, but an interesting book could be the perfect way to wind down after those jam-packed days, or to inspire you for the week ahead. For professors at the University of Kentucky, books have impacted their lives and careers in surprising ways.

Read below for the second in a series of professors reflecting on the books that shaped them, and you just may find a title or two to add to your own bookshelf. 

Christia Brown

Associate Professor of Psychology

One of the most influential books I ever read was Toni Morrison’s "The Bluest Eye," which I read my first year of college as a class assignment. It forced me, as a white girl from Tennessee, to evaluate and come


By Gail Hairston

(June 1, 2015) — There is a surplus of summer camps available for local children, but the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences offers a summer day camp experience beyond the norm — camps focusing on linguistics, geography, creative writing and philosophy that not only keep kids occupied, but engaged, active and informed.

UK Department of Geography's summer MapCamp is a weeklong day camp for children in middle school that includes exercises in map making and outdoor geo-challenges. Attendees will participate in the ancient craft of cartography, build digital interactive maps to share with the world and conduct campus treasure hunts with GPS-enabled mobile devices.

MapCamp runs June 22−26 or July 6-10, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in UK's state-of-the-art GIS and Cartography Lab (Room 313) in the White Hall Classroom building on the UK


By Sarah Schuetze

When preparing a meal, a standard cooking time can be shortened by increasing heat or pressure.  How do you begin to condense the “cook time” of a college semester? 

Fifteen weeks of class sessions, assignments, readings, discussions, projects, and tests…Sometimes it doesn’t feel long enough to fit everything in. However, UK Linguistics professor Mark Lauersdorf and visiting professor Joachim Scharloth collaborated on designing a compressed course comprised of just five days.

Instead of heat and pressure, Lauersdorf and Scharloth used intensive student interaction and a condensed schedule to serve up a complete course.

The one-credit class

Photo c. 1915-20 of UK science lab.

by Gail Hairston 

(Sept. 30, 2014) — More than an “s” has been added since the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Science was created in 1908 with only seven faculty members. In fact there was a College of Arts and Science even before the institution was named the University of Kentucky; the institution was called the State University, Lexington, Kentucky (previously Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky and State College) until 1916.

In those 106 years, several of today’s largest colleges were birthed from the original College of Arts and Science’s former programs, including today’s College of Education, College of Communication and Information, College of Social Work and College of Fine Arts.

The college grew quickly under the inspiration and commitment of President James Patterson, whose statue now graces the plaza next to the Patterson


The University of Kentucky seeks a linguist with demonstrated research and teaching expertise in phonetics. Preference will be given to candidates who can also build on the program’s strengths in sociolinguistics, corpus/computational linguistics, and historical linguistics; and contribute to teaching computational and experimental research methods. Rank is at Assistant Professor level. In exceptional circumstances we will consider an appointment at a higher rank. Teaching responsibilities will be entirely within the University’s interdepartmental Linguistics Program and will include courses at the introductory, advanced undergraduate, and graduate levels; maximum teaching load is two courses per semester. Appointment will be tenure‐line and housed in the College of Arts & Sciences, initially within the Department of English, and subsequently in the newly formed Department of

Erica Mattingly, a senior linguistics and Spanish major.

by Zachary Dodson

(July 7, 2014) — When University of Kentucky student Erica Mattingly enrolled in one of Andrew M. Byrd’s linguistics courses, she had no idea she would be rewriting history — or at least re-speaking it.

Byrd, assistant professor of linguistics in the College of Arts and Sciences, and his students have drawn national attention for their groundbreaking work to reconstruct and understand prehistoric languages.

Byrd has devoted much of his research time translating the language known as Proto-Indo-European (PIE). The language is thought to have been first used over 7,000 years ago, with some suspecting it was spoken even earlier. Byrd’s work focuses on the sounds and structure of the PIE language, aiming to understand

Jordie Gamble

by Whitney Hale

(March 13, 2014) — Two University of Kentucky students have been awarded Critical Language Scholarships to study the Arabic and Turkish languages. Marketing and media arts and studies sophomore and Global Scholar Jordie Gamble will travel to Morocco for her Arabic language studies, while anthropology doctoral student Lydia Roll will return to Turkey for her second consecutive year of language coursework in Turkish.

The Critical Language



video courtesy of UK Public Relations & Marketing

article by Jenny Wells

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2013) — In addition to research presentations, the 2014 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) will offer numerous volunteer opportunities for the entire campus community when the University of Kentucky hosts the conference April 3-5, 2014. From helping direct traffic, to managing technology, to just helping students find where they need to go, there will be a variety of positions available to students, faculty and staff.

Students will have even more flexibility to get involved, as the University Senate has given permission for faculty to redirect their classes April 3 and 4 so students can attend conference events and presentations. 

"This is a bit unusual; it's a new twist on NCUR,"


By Benjamin Kandt

The work of Dr. Andrew M. Byrd was recently featured in an on-line article for "Archaeology Magazine," in which he reads two fables constructed in the language known as Proto-Indo-European (PIE). PIE is the prehistoric ancestor of hundreds of languages, including English, Spanish, Greek, Farsi, Armenian, and more. The language is typically thought to have been in use around 7,000 years ago, though some suspect it was spoken at an even earlier time. According to certain archaeologists and the majority of linguists like Byrd, people who spoke PIE were located just to the north of the Black Sea and were likely the first to tame horses and perhaps even invented the wheel. The primary focus of Byrd’s work is to understand what this


by Victoria Dekle

(Sept. 27, 2013)  — It was an excellent summer for the Department of English as six faculty members published books in highly-regarded presses. “The English Department had an exceptional summer, but hardly an unprecedented one,” said Professor and Chairman of the English Department, Jeff Clymer. “Faculty from all areas of our department – Creative Writing, Literary Studies and Linguistics – routinely publish in the most prominent and visible presses.”

And these scholars use their knowledge and research skills to the benefit of their students. “We push our research directly into our courses,” said Clymer. “As professors at a large university, it’s the fusion of our teaching and research that we find especially exciting.”

Morphological Typology

by Keith Hautala

A collaboration between a linguist and a computer scientist at the University of Kentucky has resulted in the publication of a groundbreaking text that affords researchers a new means of assessing the complexity of languages using computer-assisted analysis.

UK linguistics Professor Gregory Stump co-authored "Morphological Typology: From Word to Paradigm," with computer science Professor Raphael Finkel. It is being published by Cambridge University Press as No.138 in its distinguished "Cambridge Studies in Linguistics" series. 

In linguistics,


by Sarah Geegan & Grace Liddle

 The College of Arts and Sciences is offering 13 courses that begin in the middle of the fall 2013 semester. For students who may have recently dropped a class or hope to pick up some extra credit hours, these courses provide flexibility after the regular registration period.

Course topics range from the science of what we eat, archaeology and history of ancient Mexico, an introductory course on the city of Lexington, and a study on the culture and economics of local and global food systems.

The "Global Food & Local Agriculture" course explores questions associated with why people eat what they do and what that implies about society. To answer these questions, the class introduces key

Aman Shah presents at the 2013 National Conference on Undergraduate Research at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. UK will host the 2014 conference.

video courtesy of UK Public Relations and Marketing

article by Jenny Wells

Planning and hosting a national conference is no easy task, but for the UK community, collaboration makes it all possible. The University of Kentucky will host the 2014 National Conference on Undergraduate Research, or NCUR, next semester, which will bring nearly 4,000 additional students from across the country to the UK campus. And as students, faculty and staff can attest -- it is something worth bragging about.

NCUR will take place April 3-5, 2014, all throughout UK's campus. The conference will give undergraduates a unique opportunity to present their research and creative endeavors, while meeting other like-minded students from all across the country. They not only promote their individual work, but improve


By Patrick O’Dowd

English Professor Armando Prats said something that stuck in Elijah Edwards' head, "We are, in great measure, the living expression of our influences."

It's a powerful sentiment that recent English graduate Edwards reflects in his own story.

Edwards, a Kentucky native from Harrodsburg, came to the University of Kentucky in 2009 as a secondary English education major but quickly picked up two more: English and linguistics. That might seem like a lot to take on in four years, but for Edwards the workload was made manageable due to the nature of degrees from the

The 35th annual Kentucky Women Writers Conference has unveiled its line-up for the literary event scheduled Sept. 20–21, 2013, and tickets may now be purchased. The conference, which will feature Louisville poet Kiki Petrosino and other acclaimed writers from around the nation, will also offer five new postgraduate scholarships to attend the event. Photo courtesy of Kentucky Women Writers Conference.
By Whitney Hale   The 35th annual Kentucky Women Writers Conference has unveiled its line-up for the literary event scheduled Sept. 20–21, 2013, and tickets may now be purchased. The conference, which will feature Louisville poet Kiki Petrosino and other acclaimed writers from around the nation, will also offer five new postgraduate scholarships to attend the event.   The Kentucky Women Writers Conference is an annual event known for bringing notable women writers to Lexington for readings, writing workshops and discussions. A program housed in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, the conference is made possible in part by continued community partnerships, including its primary venue, the Carnegie
by Sarah Geegan   The 73rd annual convention of the College Language Association (CLA) will blossom in the Bluegrass this year. Themed, "Mason-Dixon and Maginot Lines: Borders, Boundaries and Barriers in Languages and Literatures," the conference will last from April 11-13, with pre-convention events on Wednesday, April 10.   The CLA, an organization that fosters high professional standards for teachers of languages, literature and creative writing, will hold its annual convention at the University of Kentucky. The event will include scholarly presentations, opportunities to exchange ideas with other colleagues and dialogues with specialists brought in by the association.   UK English professor Vershawn Young

by Keith Hautala

Older adults who have spoken two languages since childhood are faster than single-language speakers at switching from one task to another, according to a study conducted at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.

The study also found that lifelong bilinguals show different patterns of brain activity than their monolingual counterparts when making the switch.  

The research was led by Brian Gold, associate professor of anatomy and neurobiology, who specializes in cognitive neuroscience. The article, "Lifelong Bilingualism Maintains Neural Efficiency for Cognitive Control in Aging," was published in the Jan. 9 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

As people age, cognitive flexibility — the ability to adapt to unfamiliar or unexpected circumstances — and related "executive"

President Clinton with Students


By Sarah Geegan   What began as a brainstorm for some kind of community service project became very real for seven University of Kentucky students and for the people of Owsley County, Ky. These seven students established a project redefining community service — empowering the entire county just 87 miles from Lexington to bolster itself against the debilitating factors affecting Eastern Kentucky.  

In November, the James W. Stuckert Career Center assembled a UK team to participate in the Clinton Global Initiative University, a program through which university students propose solutions to the world's humanitarian problems. While each of the students came from different backgrounds, from the College of Arts and Sciences to the 

sickening queens poster


By Sarah Geegan, Jessica Powers

The University of Kentucky Department of Gender and Women's Studies will host a series of lectures covering the diverse topic of queens. The lectures will be given by professors Rusty BarrettSusan Bordo and Karen Tice.


Barrett, assistant professor of linguistics, will present his lecture, titled "Sickening Queens," Thursday, Feb. 16.  The lecture will showcase linguistic research to explore how drag performances reflect social and cultural differences related to class and ethnicity — including differences in language use,


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