#linguistics

Language Diversity in Educational Settings

Dunstan is the NCSU Assistant Director of the Office of Assessment. Her research examines dialect as an element of diversity that shapes the college experience, particularly for speakers of non-standardized dialects of English. Dunstan and Jaeger (2015) found that students from rural, Southern Appalachia felt that their use of a regional dialect put them at a disadvantage in the college classroom. The students interviewed by Dunstan reported that “they had been hesitant to speak in class, felt singled out, dreaded oral presentations, tried to change the way they talked, and felt that they had to work harder to earn the respect of faculty and peers”. In addition to speaking about her work with Appalachian college students, Dunstan would accompany members of the Department of Linguistics to a meeting with the UK office of Academic and Student Affairs to discuss how to meet the needs of all UK students, regardless of linguistic background.

Date: 
Friday, April 3, 2020 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
233 Gatton B&E
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Year of Equity Series: Linguists often talk the talk but how can we also walk the walk

    Part of diversity is linguistic diversity; part of equity is
    linguistic equity; and part of inclusion is linguistic inclusion.
 Yet, despite the many university initiatives around diversity,
    equity, inclusion and access, language and linguistic diversity
    are rarely part of the constellation of identity practices that
 are seen outside of linguistics as warranting efforts toward
    greater justice. Linguists can and should play an important
    role in advocating for the centrality of language within 
    inclusivity efforts, but many of our efforts to do so are less
    effective than we might hope.
 
    In this talk, I’ll explore some of the potential reasons why
    this has been the case and imagine (with your insight and help) 
    some ways that linguists could have more success in our efforts
    to enhance linguistic justice. By framing linguistic inclusion 
    in the context of standardized language privilege, I’ll present
    what we know about linguistic discrimination, pinpoint the
    linguistic stakes of DEI efforts, highlight some flashpoints
    that occur in public discussions about language such as with
    pronouns and political correctness, and finally offer some
    concrete steps that we as linguists can take to effectively
    advocate for the importance of language at all levels of
    intervention linked to greater inclusion and equity.
 
This talk is made possible by generous support from our friends in Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures; English; Gender and Women’s studies; Sociology; Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; African American and Africana Studies; and the College of Arts and Sciences.
Date: 
Friday, November 8, 2019 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
233 Gatton College of B&E
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Colloquium Speaker Series

Date: 
Friday, October 4, 2019 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
233 Gatton College of B&E
Tags/Keywords:
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Colloquium Speaker Series: An Overview of the Miami-Illinois Language

In this presentation, David Costa will provide an introduction to MiamiIllinois, an Algonquian language of Indiana and Illinois. Costa will first discuss the geographic setting of Miami-Illinois and its place with Algonquian, following with an overview of the data sources on the language. He will also provide a brief sketch of the phonology of the Miami-Illinois, and, time permitting, finish with a discussion of some of the more notable grammatical features of the language, such as animacy, transitivity, pro-drop, obviation, and basic word order
Date: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
233 Gatton College of B&E
Tags/Keywords:
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Raciolinguistic Ideologies in German Language Education: A Corpus-Analytic Approach

Pre-Reading

https://educationallinguist.wordpress.com/2015/06/14/why-we-need-raciolinguistics/

 

Software/Corpus Tools

Please come to seminar with your laptop, prepared to access the following corpus tools. All of these are web-based, so there are no downloads required; however, some require advance registration.

Datenbank für gesprochenes Deutsch (Please register for an account–registration takes 1-2 business days, so please do so in advance!)

Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (No registration required. Just be ready to navigate to the homepage and we will take it from there)

Sketch Engine (Please register for 30-day free trial within 30 days of Oct. 11; in the long-term, subscriptions are affordable and many Universities purchase institutional subscriptions)

Date: 
Friday, October 11, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Tags/Keywords:

UK Linguistics Third Annual MLK Colloquium: Human rights, indigenous rights, and the current crisis at the border

In honor of the memory of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. and the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, this talk highlights the place of attitudes towards indigenous languages in the formation and reproduction of the human rights violations seen in recent events involving Central American immigrants seeking refuge in the United States. In 2018, two children died in the Border Patrol custody and a Border Patrol agent shot a young woman in the head. All three were native speakers of indigenous (Mayan) languages from Guatemala. The talk will first outline the history and current state of the issues behind the current immigration by Guatemalan Maya. The central role of language in the creation and current perpetuation of human rights violations will focus on two related factors. The first issue is that of language access. The denial of language access is sustained through negative attitudes towards indigenous languages and the persistent myth of the “desperate need” for indigenous interpreters. The second major issue is the failure to recognize or legitimize indigenous traditions of language use needed in the interpreting context. These include the conventions for holding a conversation, expectations for who should speak in what context, and forms of politeness. Consideration of these issues suggests that equality for indigenous peoples will never be achieved unless we first come to recognize and respect the languages they speak.
 
Warning:  to accurately present reality this talk contains graphic content.
Date: 
Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
UKAA Auditorium, WTY Library

CKLiC Graduate Conference Day 2

The Central Kentucky Linguistics Conference (CKLiC) is an annual springtime conference hosted by the University of Kentucky Department of Linguistics. It provides a place for graduate students in linguistics to engage in professional development, as well as showcase their own work in a full conference environment.

CKLiC participants please click here for more information. 

Date: 
Saturday, February 24, 2018 - 8:00am to 5:00pm
Location: 
Jacobs Science Building, Rm. 121
Tags/Keywords:

CKLiC Graduate Conference Day 1

The Central Kentucky Linguistics Conference (CKLiC) is an annual springtime conference hosted by the University of Kentucky Department of Linguistics. It provides a place for graduate students in linguistics to engage in professional development, as well as showcase their own work in a full conference environment.

CKLiC participants please click here for more information. 

Date: 
Friday, February 23, 2018 - 4:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Jacobs Science Building, Rm. 221(Posters), 321(Talks)
Tags/Keywords:

Talking Place, Speaking Race: African Americans, Their Englishes, and Local Identity

Sociolinguists, long concerned with the connections between language and localness, have shown that the ways in which speakers use features of ethnoracially or locally marked varieties are highly salient in their construction of identities of place. In the urban U.S., place identity is enmeshed with identities of class and identities of race: to be from a place is to embody its racial makeup and class delineations just as much as its physical locale.  
 
This present study combines quantitative analysis and discourse analysis to analyze the speech of middle- and upper-class African American residents of a rapidly-gentrifying neighborhood in Washington, D.C. The data show that drawing upon an ethnolinguistic repertoire (Benor 2010) which combines features of African American English style as well as features of prestige white varieties of English allows speakers to reinforce racial identities which align them with the neighborhood's rich African American identity even while their class identity might better align them with the outsiders. Ultimately, I argue that the linguistic expression of class and place identity is not an add-on to the enactment of racial identities, but that language is in fact the primary site wherein these intersecting identities are negotiated.
Date: 
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
WTY Library 2-34a (Active Learning Classroom)
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Dr. King and Chatino Political Discourse

Dr. King & Chatino Political Discourse, an event in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

In March 1965, after the bloody march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered a sermon entitled, "Our God is Marching On!" This is political discourse trying to affect change in racial understanding towards greater equality while using religious themes and oratorical styles found in the pulpit. In this lecture by Dr. Hilaria Cruz, there will be comparisons on theme, repetition and parallelism to the political discourse found in San Juan Quiahije, Oaxaca, Mexico. Here in this remote place another racial minority to the greater Mexican society strives for equality using religion in political discourse.

 

An event in honor of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. sponsored by the UK Department of Linguistics

Date: 
Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 12:30pm
Location: 
WTY UKAA Auditorium
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - #linguistics
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading